Hidden Gems: Cult Cinema – Cosmic Horror I & II (2016/2017)

Genre: Black metal / hardcore punk

Release date: 3rd November, 2016 (Cosmic Horror I) / 11th April, 2017 (Cosmic Horror II)

Record label: (Self-released)

For fans of: Mayhem, Darkthrone, Amebix

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Cosmic Horror I

Blackened London punks Cult Cinema are a despondent bunch, fuelled by an unbridled sense of anarchy in their dark musical ventures, as demonstrated by their recent twin EP’s, Cosmic Horror I & II. Unveiled over the course of the past six months, the short dual releases are punchy slices of direct extreme music, blending the harshest of punk rock with the infamously dangerous genre of black metal.

Primarily driven by thrashing, chord-based lead guitar and high, Ihsahn-esque screams of agony, the Cosmic Horror EP’s are practically drowning in the hallmarks of ‘90s Norwegian black metal, channelling arguably the most dangerous musical movement in recent memory. The meat of the records relies on short, hard-hitting compositions, with the neck-snappingly pummelling “Midnight Man” and “Glass Coffin” both coming in at three-and-a-half minutes, while the all-killer-no-filler “Bad Blood” adds a hardcore punk sentimentality with a combination of unyielding pace and sheer animosity.

However, both Cosmic Horror’s also have the ability to take their time, with each disc closing with the lengthier “Distress Signal” and “Labyrinth of Solitude” respectively. It is in these moments that Cult Cinema truly shines, replacing some of the punk for a more doom metal aesthetic. These longer cuts are more tactful and deliberate than their shorter counterparts, taking their time and craft a truly demonic, ominous feel.

So, for black metal fans, every second of Cosmic Horror is a blessing. The EP’s are 100% nihilism and emotive destruction, pumping forth pure darkness at both intense and deliberate speeds. As far as recapturing the glory days of black metal goes, Cult Cinema may be one of this generation’s brightest hopes.

Cosmic Horror I & II are both available via Cult Cinema’s Bandcamp page.

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